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-year anniversary of superstorm sandy's landfall on the northeast and the destruction that it brought to a ruinous path through connecticut, new york, new jersey, and rhode island. and i will be joined today on the floor and ask unanimous consent that we be permitted to engage in a colloquy by my colleagues from new york, senator schumer; and from rhode island, senator whitehouse, if there is no objection. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. blumenthal: thank you, mr. president. i can scarcely capture in words the awesome, monstrous power of this storm as it hit the northeast. and as i traveled through it, i was near the coastline of connecticut, traveling some of the roads in the midst of this storm as it ripped through my state, tearing apart communities along our coast, destroying homes and businesses, displacing families, forever altering the shoreline itself. and anybody who questions the power of nature at its most destructive should have seen this storm as it unfolded and the damage that it left in its wake. in fact, in connecticut, $770 million in damages. what i remember from to
katie: you can go to our website for updated information on resources available for sandy victims and steve buscemi's friends for firefighters continues to provide support to families. you can go to katiecouric.com to see how you can help. up next they proudly served our country and now they are on a new mission. meet the veterans using their military skills to help those in need when disaster strikes. hat is right after this. >> up next -- katie: thank goodness for you guys really stepping up to the plate. >> and later the truth about all of this extreme weather. katie: welcome back. in her wake sandy left what looked like a war zone behind. who tackled this crisis more than the nation's veterans. how many know of a group called team rubicon. a lot of people. for the viewers at home i hope you never get a chance to meet them. if you do you will never forget them. it all started with an urge to help. co-founders and marine veterans knew they could do just that. they left for haiti after the earthquake in 2010 and soon realized the impact that they could have. so they sent out a ca
. due to water and fire and wind. hurricane sandy ravaged the east coast, some places scarred forever, others coming back slowly. and we'll have more on all of it in just a moment. but again this evening, it is a big problem on the part of the government that starts off our broadcast. specifically, this new health care law. beyond the colossal problems with the website well chronicled, now it is the assurances by the president that are drawing scrutiny when he told americans if you liked your health care plan, you could keep it. well, with insurance companies discontinuing some policies of some people, we finding that's no longer the case. as many deal with the potential for new higher costs. our senior investigative correspondent lisa myers broke the story for us last night and has more for washington tonight. good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening. so far almost 2 million of the 14 million americans who buy individual coverage have gotten letters that their policy is canceled or has to change because of the law. still the white house insists the president did not mislead ame
, literally, one year ago and mighty superstorm sandy knocking on our door, this was a day of changing tum mulletious weather waves in excess of 15 feet. check out a video called megamonday to see how big those waves were. the tremendous huge snows in garrett county, probably our hardest hit county in the state would be the incredible snow and damage with that in garrett county, just one year ago. in the meantime, nothing but a few showers. through midday tomorrow 60 and 64 by 4:00. almost no wind. quiet on the range as they say and temperature wise in the mid- 60s south of us. 60 in baltimore. a few upper 50s to the north. again, quiet tonight and tomorrow. clouds will thicken up. we could see a passing shower. more unsettled weather begins to edge in. along the boundary which drifted south, some cooler temps. area of low pressure along the front and it could mean brief showers unless all the moisture gets rung out in the mountains. computer models splitting in terms of will we see rain. some indications that the showers will diminish and some that they will hang together. not a lot of ra
.terrorist attack. >>> coming up on al jazeera america. it has been a year since sandy hit and people are still dealing with their insurance companies. antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is tly or isis targ you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on >> welcome back. texas is now appealing a decision, about abortions, opponents claim it is unconstitutional, the judge agreed. states attorney general claims that the case could go all the way to the supreme court. well checking the big board, stocks not moving as much today on data as consumer confidence offsets the positive earning
.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. today marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy ,itting the ne east coast becoming one of the most a struct of storms in the nation history. after first pummeling cuba, jamaica, and the dominican republic, sandy made its way up the east coast. the storm ultimately killed 150 nine people, damaged more than 650,000 homes. thousands of people remain displaced. as the new york region marks the first anniversary of the hurricane, hurricane strength winds are battling northern europe today. at least a dozen people have been killed across britain, germany, the netherlands, denmark, and france. later in the show we will look at the superstorm sandy recovery effort and speak to a woman who is still displaced from her home. we begin today's show with former irish president mary robinson. she served as president of ireland from 1990 to 1997 and you and high commissioner for human rights from 1997 to 2002. she now heads the mary robinson justice.n climate i recently sat down with her in new orleans the meeting of groups.ental >> climate justice starts
super storm sandy, and people are still trying to recover. >>> and storms bearing down on europe, canceling hundreds of flights. >> europe is looking for answers concerning u.s. surveillance programs as more spying allegations are come to go light. "el mundo" report that national security agency spied there as well. they will now summon an explanation. it comes as an european delegation is visiting the u.s. >> reporter: erica ferrari has more. >> reporter: a nine member of european lawmakers will be in washington this week seeking sense. they'll meet with u.s. government and intelligence officials overall gas stations of widespread spying by the national security agency against e.u. leaders. allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. >> i can tell you that the president assured the chancellor that the u.s. is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancell chancellor. >> reporter: and it's not just the european who is are upset. over the weekend thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> we're agai
sandy forever changed the landscape of 24 states. how well have we recovered? and what's ahead. >>> plus, st. louis juggled both the world series and "monday night football." >>> britney spears is unknowingly helping the u.s. fight somali pirates. >>> and he's just your average 8'3" happy groom. "early today" starts right now. >>> this is "early today" for tuesday, october 29th. >>> good morning. i'm richard l u6789 i'm richard lui. an obama care bombshell. an investigation finds the obama administration reportedly knew for at least three years that millions of americans would not be able to keep their health insurance. that has been one of president obama's key selling points for his new health care law. >> if you've got health insurance, it doesn't mean a government takeover. you keep your own insurance. if you like your plan, you can keep your plan. >> but four sources deeply involved in the affordable care act tell nbc news between 45% to 50% can expect to find a cancellation letter in the past year. the reason, their existing policies do not meet the minimum standards mandated by th
health care plan. >>> hurricane sandy one year later, the families with their amazing survival stories, but are we ready for the next super storm? >>> made in america, you heard it here first, those olympic uniforms made in china. big news today about what team usa will wear this time. >>> going to extremes, the surfer trying to ride this giant wave into the record books, why dare devils push the limits, the real reason they do it. >>> good evening. diane is off tonight after a day of double trouble for the white house. scrambling to diffuse not one but two firestorms. the president accused of making false promises, even lying about obama care. that was on one side of capitol hill. on the other, new calls for a total stop to spying on friends. what did the president know? how much damage has been done and what will he do now. abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl starts us off. >> reporter: under fire for allegedly spying on americans and america's friends, the nation's spy chief made no apologies. >> we do not spy on anyone except for valid foreign intelligence purposes,
, super storm sandy made landfall in my part of the united states. its impact up and down the east coast were devastating and heartbreaking. new york, new jersey, parts of new england were hit particularly hard. in delaware, we did not experience the level of devastation that was inflicted on our neighbors to the north and to the east, but our state did receive significant damage. in total, there were over 200 detectives attributed to superstorm sandy. today we remem remember the lives lost and those forever impacted by this storm. as i travel through delaware during and after the storm i saw some of the massive impacts of that storm firsthand. but i saw something else as well. i saw people from all walks of life pulling together, helping one another and taking care of their neighbors. the impacts of that superstorm are still fresh in my mind today as we continue to rebuild. in delaware, new jersey, in new york, and other places up the east coast. but not only are the impacts of the superstorm still fresh in my mind, something else is as well and that is this: the extraordinary efforts o
and tried to get ready. hurricane sandy was on the way up, up from the caribbean, to the east coast. seeming huge and mercilessly. we have experienced a lot of hurricanes in this country, but for sheer size, sandy was without precedent. sandy was the largest single storm system to ever form in the atlantic ocean. and it was aiming for the most densely populated part of the united states. it was aiming for our nation's largest cities. and that city, rates like all the others to get ready for this gigantic storm. new york sent out evacuation orders for people living in flood zones, they built sandbag walls at office buildings. they shut down the subway system. they locked the door to grand central terminal. but for all the desperate measures to protect from the great state of new york, there was one place they needed to protect maybe most desperately of all. this is harlem. this is the end of the number three train line, one of the red ones on the map, if you visit and if you do visit, you should use that line, you can go up and see harlem. ive you zoom out and look at that station on the map,
. >> one year after hurricane sandy, some families still have not been able to pic pick up the pieces. why an insurance loophole is preventing some from rebuilding their storm-ravaged homes. >> good morning. welcome to august america. it's great to have you with us. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas day den. the national security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when talking about the future of the nation's spy agency. >> a bipartisan group of lawmakers is expected to introduce a bill that could curtail the n.s.a.'s powers to indiscriminately collect personal information. >> the u.s.a. freedom act is authored by patrick lahee. it would provide restrictions against who the n.s.a. could target and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally, more aggressively than it does now. the bill has a dozen co sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile, sena
>> i was like are we going to lose our lives? >> the youngest victims of hurricane sandy speaking out a year after the super storm. ♪ >> europe searching for answers about u.s. surveillance programs as new spying revelations come to light. el mundo reported that the national security agency spied on 60 million phone conversations there alone. it comes as an european delegation now visiting the u.s. al jazeera now join us from the white house. how has the white house responded to these latest allegations of spying on world leaders. >> reporter: as far as the latest allegations on the spanish, the millions of spanish who have been monitored by the nsa, nothing yet. we have a briefing coming up in an hour or so where we expect questions to be asked. as far as previous allegations we have an anonymous leak to the wall street journal saying that president obama knew nothing about this until this summer when he had an internal review--there wasn't an internal review, he found about it then and immediately put a stop to the spying on german chancellor angela merkel. but other reports s
tank down the stairs. >> one vicious sandy and one loving sandy in the same night. >> breaking news tonight as police search for the man who robbed one woman and sexually assaulted another in hyattsville. it happened along beltstown road on east, west highway. debra is there live right now with the latest on the investigation. debra. >> and they say he attacked not one, but two women in two separate groups right here in the woods. it happened earlier today and they say with helicopters in the air, this man hunt is on. if he can attack one person, he can attack two people, who knows what he could do next. >> crime tape search dogs, cops with guns. this is the response when you have a brazen sex attacker on the loose. police say it was after 2:00 this afternoon when two women in their 20s were walking along the ground of the plaza towers apartment complex here in hyattsville. they pass a van, they head into the woods. there's walking trails there. he follows, he starts to sexually assault one, hear something stopped, and takes off. then he comes across a second group, this time they
storm sandy slammed the shore impacting tens of thousands of people. many families are still struggling erica continues our original series surviving sandy one year later where a loophole in the national flood insurance program has survivors still stranding. it is is first home they had owned before super storm sandy slammed into their shoreline town. >> it was hart breaking. >> yeah. >> it was heart wregeing. >> but it was kind of -- it was tough to separate out our situation from everybody else's because there was such a collective heartbreak. where are you one year later? >> basically, exactly the same place we were. this is basically where the foundation cracked all the way down through the footing. which buckled the inside of the house and the floors. >> first things first, fix the foundation, since they had flood insurance, they thought they were covered, but when they went to collect their claim with the national flood insurance program that's run by fema, they were flatly denied. even if the earth movement is caused by flood. >> it made absolutely no sense that you can have a wh
museum at ellis island damaged in the storm, reopened its doors. >> sandy is not a one of a kind storm. the reality is it could let any time, anyplace. >> unbelievable. going from flooding rains a year ago to a beautiful picturesque end to your evening. 61 in the city. pear of fives in ellicott city. go down to the south. here come some clouds. we are anticipating more clouds. believe it or not, clouds will act as an insulator keeping our numbers mild. 50 in the city. cooler to the north and west. frederick around 39. some showers are working through the ohio valley. that could be in here by tomorrow morning's commute. we'll talk about that not seven- day forecast. >>> in less than an hour a meeting will be held to talk about the affordable care act. it is being held from 7 to 8:30 mat good samaritan hospital. >>> speaking of that site, the consecutive director of the hockey, change said she's in the satisfied with it. they're working with the main contractor to make all the changes and improvements. >>> well, for the first time we are hearing an aful -- apology from the people involve
sandy pounded the northeast, it is open to visitors. >> while some visits will remain closed, visitors can see the great haul, the first place immigrants saw arriving in the u.s. >> for more, let's go to john, who is on ellis island this morning. ellis island suffered terrible damage during sandy. how much of the facility will be open today for visitors? >> well, stephanie, good morning. it's a 27.5-acre site here. just to give you an indication of where we are actually sited, so you know, we're in the northern end of new york harbor. we'll get jimmy, our cameraman to pan over the financial district in manhattan. this site is most famous today for the american immigration museum, and tourists who do come here today for the first time in a year will see the famous halls and they'll see the big great hall where as tom was saying just now, immigrants got their first glance at the united states, and that famous staircase where immigrants were vetted by the doctors as they went up the staircase. the doctors was looking at them to see if they had diseased. many of them, 2% of the people who
over nsa spying on foreign leaders. will the white house dump the program? >>> and sandy, one year later. new jersey governor chris christie answers victims who claim they are forgotten. >> but we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> obviously, you're going to want to know exactly what the president knew and when he knew it. >> the white house under fire for nsa spy secrets. >> president obama saying that he was not aware until recently of spying on heads of state. >> but the "los angeles times" reports the white house signed off on the program. but the president did not know that raises serious questions. >> i've been imprisoned by allegiant airlines or over eight hours. >> passenger aboard the allegiant 1032 had to be on three different flights because of mechanical problems at oakland international airport. >> yes, ma'am. >>> the white house acknowledging there are some individual existing health care plans that do not qualify for obama care. >> what is the political fallout when the other guys committing su
a program that could stop a terror attack. >> one year after superstorm sandy, officials say more work is needed to rebuild. the hurricane caused $55 billion in damage. >> the dow jones hit a high on wednesday, closing up. investors are expecting the federal reserve to scale back plans in relation to the bond buy-back program. "consider this" is up next. >> one year after the superstorm sandy the eastern seaboard is still recovering. after billions were pledged for the recovery why are so many people still homeless and why has so little of the money basketbalbasketballbeenspent. >> president obama's tenure has seen it's share of controversy. how is his approval rating so high is he the second teflon president. >> and hard-core fans spend countless hours into the fantasticsy football league should they be able to spend money and b bye buy shares. >> we begin with superstorm sandy. 12 months after the storm batter theebattered the northeast. many are still waiting to rebuild. al jazeera reports from a stat staton island neighborhood that turned out to be the deadliest place to be in new
's performance during sandy. do the job elected officials do, could have done more or failed the people of new jersey. we'll share the results later in the show. we'll be right back. >>> hi there. it's a big day here at msnbc. we launched our new website today, one of the tools you can make your own poll. here's one we created. it starts with a, quote, i'm concerned about the fact that there seems to be a war on the -- which cable news personality said this? if you selected mother, you would be right because it was this guy. >> i'm john casey, in tonight for bill o'reilly who's on vacation and i want to thank you for watching us. >> yes, before he was a republican governor of ohio john casey was a hoers over at fox news. so it raised quite a few eyebrows when he said, i'm concerned about the fact that there seems to be a war on the poor, that if you're poor you're somehow shiftless or crazy. just take a few seconds to remember why you know the name john casey, because he enraged working ohioans in 2011 by pushing through a restrictive collective bargaining law. he pushed ahead with his agenda
there was a crash that injured seven people. >>> one year ago super storm sandy devastated parts of maryland, delaware, new york and certainly new jersey. today some areas are still trying to recover. wjz and mike schuh are live with more on the storm's impact and that recovery. good morning, mike. >> reporter: good morning. for most of us sandy is no longer in our head lines. for those who lost everything it still tops their personal front page. >> a bonfire in sea bright, new jersey marks a celebration of survival for those who endured d super storm sandy last year. >> a year after the storm ravaged areas of new jersey and new york rebuilding continues. flooding and fire wiped out homes also. >> right now every conversation we have leads to hurricane sandy. i look forward to the day when we move beyond that. >> stories of hope continue to emerge. in rock away, new york the home of rosa vasquez looked like this january. the house has been rebuilt with numerous donated items. >> it's overwhelming when you don't have your own place to go to. to finally have your own home and be able to come h
today to mark one year since superstorm sandy first came ashore in new jersey killing 71 people in that state. 346,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. 26,000 people are still out of their homes. >> our conversation with new jersey governor chris christie permitting he was the face of disaster response but we begin with elaine quijano in seaside heights, new jersey. elaine, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah and viewers in the west. sandy was the biggest and fiercest storm ever to hit new jersey, costing the state nearly $40 billion in damage. recovery has been slow and for many it's far from over. when superstorm sandy slammed ashore last october, more than 100 miles of new jersey's coastline bore the brunt of it. communities split in half homes crushed, others simply washed away. in seaside heights the same boardwalk and heart of the shore town's economy took a pounding. >> this is our lives, how we feed our family, support ourselves. >> reporter: mike carbone had to completely rebuild the first and second floors of his restaurant aft
of eavesdropping, and i don't think they can, it ought to end right now. >> hurricane sandy, a history making event coming ashore and changing the map of the coastline in some places. >> the comeback coast. one year ago today millions were bracing for the impact of hurricane sandy. it was the superstorm strong enough to carve out a new shoreline, bring a presidential campaign to a halt and test resilience of communities across the east coast. >> you can see the water up to my knees, more importantly, a record storm surge here in new york city. >> it's been an all day battle between mother nature in the form of hurricane sandy. >>> good day. i'm andrea mitchell in washington. at this time last year sandy was a category one hurricane still hours away from making landfall in new jersey. as the storm gains strength, residents up and down the eastern seaboard were bracing for impact. some of the communities devastate add year ago are still reeling a year later. nbc's al roker was on the jersey shore when sandy hit and has an update on the still ongoing recovery. >> sandy slammed ashore one year ago, new
families to spend a bit more time. >> thank you. one year since superstorm sandy wreaked havoc across the east coast. a lot of families still struggling to pick up the pieces. thousands of people are displaced, staying in hotels, staying with friends or families. many haven't fwun to repair their battered homes. there's a new problem mounting for the community. many may have no choice but to leave for good because of skyrocketing insurance rates. some homeowners say flood insurance rates could go up by as much as 500% to nearly $10,000 a year because avenue federal law passed after sandy. sandy victims are questioning the pace of aid. in august the government just announced $5 billion of the $60 billion aid damage has been spent. another $5 billion began to filter out yesterday. that's 50 out left hanging in the balance. superstorm sandy claimed 182 lives in the united states and we'll have more on that in "morning joe" as well. that brings us to our twitter question. it's a little east coast bias and we apologize to the rest country. where were you when sandy hit and even if you were
it was in 2007. coming up next on al jazeera, it has been a year since hurricane sandy hit, and people who were hit the hardest still having to deal with their insurance companies. all next week america tonight investigates the campus rape crisis. >> serial rape is the norm on college campuses. >> i know that when i did report, i was blamed. >> then this friday at nine eastern, we open up the conversation in a live town-hall event. sex crimes on campus, a special week of coverage and live town-hall on america tonight nine eastern. only on al jazeera america. (vo) gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. this sunday: it seemed like a normal adoption >> do you think this family has a lot of secrets? >> it's like there's an open book as far as the family goes. >> (son - off screen) i fully believe that i was adopted by strangers. (vo) until one day ... >> (son - off screen) i found out everything i thought i knew, was a lie. (vo) al jazeera america presents open secret super storm sandy destroyed thousands of homes up and down the eastern seaboard. especially hard hit the coastal
>>> sandy anniversary one year ago. the superstorm averaged the east coast. >> the communities struggling to survive. >> hello, i'm jessica kartalija. >> i'm don scott. here is what people are talking about today. >>> people up and down the east coast including maryland hunkered down as superstorm sandy roared through. 137 people were killed and hundreds of thousands of homes were killed. we are in breezy point, new york as the recovery efforts continue. >> reporter: construction crews are hard at work in breezy point one year later removing pieces of an old foundation. half the neighborhood is not back in its home after the superstorm triggered a massive fire. >> there had to be about 70 homes fully engaged, flames 50 to 80 feet high. >> he spent the next six months rebuilding his home. >> i can't believe it's a year. >> reporter: sandy cause destroyed hundreds of thousands of homes, flowed lower manhattan and left a roller coaster in the ocean. 350 homes in breezy point were destroyed. high school students that lost their homes are pitching in on this year anniversary, formi
superstorm sandy. >> what a year. >>> good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> so many people perplexed this morning is it really possible the u.s. was eavesdropping on ally world leaders for years and president obama didn't know? no one told him? phone conversations from u.s. friends like german chancellor angela merkel. the administration insists the president did not know. now he is ordering a full review of the nsa surveillance operations and the foreign relations fallout. here is more from our chief national security correspondent jim sciutto. >> reporter: president obama would not confirm the nsa was spying on the phone calls of u.s. allies like germany's chancellor angela merkel. >> the national security operations generally have one purpose and that is to make sure that the american people are safe. i'm making a review to make sure what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: senior administration officials tell cnn president obama did not know about the nsa surveilla
is over. ♪ ♪ >> one year after the superstorm sandy the eastern seaboard is still recovering. after billions were pledged for the recovery why are so many people still homeless and why has so little of the money basketbalbasketballbeenspent. >> president obama's tenure has seen it's share of controversy. how is his approval rating so high is he the second teflon president. >> and hard-core fans spend countless hours into the fantasticsy football league should they be able to spend money and b bye buy shares. >> we begin with superstorm sandy. 12 months after the storm batter theebattered the northeast. many are still waiting to rebuild. al jazeera reports from a stat staton island neighborhood that turned out to be the deadliest place to be in new york. in 2012. one year later recovery seems unlikely if not impossible. some chose to spend the day in somber reflection. >> terrible. i wouldn't want to live here anymore. anyone that dog does are frightened. >> she drew u drew up here grewt her summers on the beach. >> many home tha hope that the t will buy people out. this was one of t
the nsa spying allegations. ellis island opened for the first time since hurricane sandy hit last year. and now there's a new fbi director. spain is now the latest u.s. ally complaining about those american surveillance programs. spain's elmundo newspaper reporting that the nsa tracked 60,000 phone calls during a one month period. comes as a european delegation is already in the united states looking for answers. live from the white house, the european parliament committee, they wrapped up, what happened? >> their first port of call mike rogers. you may remember over the weekend he was saying on the sunday talk shows that europe should in fact be grateful for all the surveillance keeping them safe. much talk after that meeting those, a frank dialogue, ongoing dialogue but this is how the chairman of that european delegation put the problems as europe sees it off all of this nsa surveillance. >> we want to figure out why this kind of mass itch activities -- massive activities happening. in the end we're fighting a battle in terms of security, we need to get that balance right. we're con
that report from china. still to come on tonight's practice. , ear after superstorm sandy many residents are still struggling to recover. >> making a meal in india is getting more expensive by the day with the price of some staple foods quadrupleding in recent months. the cost of an onion has tripled. why are prices rising so fast? here is our report. >> it is bitter and green, but one of the most widely eaten vegetables in india. the price, which is one of the cheapest vegetables in the market has gone up nearly three times compared to the same period last year. this farmer says that this year's crop costs more to produce, and that is why he has to charge more. farmers use trucks to transport products across the length and bread this of the country. here also the cost has gone up. >> the cost of transportation has gone up in the last year due to higher fool costs. we transport vegetables to mumbai to far-off places, so we have no choice but at the charge more. >> after a long journey, it reached its first destination. farmer sell their crops to these, who in turn tell them to consumers.
today. >> super storm sandy a year later. we will see how the worst natural disasters in new jersey is being remembered. >> the top questions congress have in a few hours for the administration official at the center of the troubled obamacare [s[man] no one told her,right?a. [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> a year ago today, super storm sandy slammed into the eastern seaboard changing the lives of millions washing homes into the ocean and left neighborhoods underwater. the recovery effort has been ongoing since. we take you to new jersey. >> good morning, kristen. they are still rebuilding at this beach. the boardwalk is new and the sand has been raised to protect the residents. a lost signs of progress but there is still a lot of work to do. a year after super storm sandy's fury along the east coast, signs of recovery. ellis i'll left in the dark if -- for months, re-open. the seaport is back open for business after 85 percent of the businesses were shut. in long beach, a new 2.2-mile ford walk that is supposed to withstand the next storm. >> we have made great problem but that means not
is it taking years? >> epic sandy. they called it the monster storm. one of the biggest and baddest ever to hit the northeast. we're taking sandy by the numbers to see how it all adds ♪ [ man ] adventure, it means taking chances. it means trying something new. [ woman ] just, that uncertainty of what's to come. [ man ] just kidding. ♪ can you please stop doing that? ♪ [ woman ] you walk outside in brooklyn, and it's cement and broken glass. and this is just like... the opposite of that. ♪ >>> good evening. world leaders are up in arms over america's secret information gathering, but not just the government collecting data. we are living in the days of do it yourself sleuth. suspicious of your spouse? worried about your kids? there is an app for that. abc's juju chang dives into a world where secrets are quickly becoming a thing of the past. >> reporter: whether snooping on your neighbors as posted on youtube, keeping tabs on your sitter or just trying to bust your two-timing spouse it seems nearly everyone is spying on someone. the right to privacy may be a bed rock principle in our cou
and the new jersey area took a beating from superstorm sandy last year. >> and as we hear the report, it took 364 days since that storm for ellis island to reopen to the public. >> reporter: boats filled with tourists returned to ellis island for the first time since superstorm sandy slammed the historic site last october. jace and lisa chenko came from cleveland. >> my father passed away about a month ago. it's kind of nice to trace the roots about where he came through and see where he first stepped foot on this country. >> reporter: vincent courtier brought his daughters from france. >> it's a big part of new york. >> reporter: rob lure brings groups of students from wales every year. >> last year the children of gutted they couldn't see it. it's great to bring these guys today. >> reporter: ellis island and liberty island needed about $77 million in repairs after the storm sent a wall of water slamming into the new york harbor. the national landmark was flooded left without power for months. here in registry hall as many as 5,000 immigrants entered the u.s. every day. now about that m
, and super storm sandy, a year later. >> one by one world leaders and u.s. allies are learning the nsa has been spying on them. and the latest is staunch u.s. ally and the german chancellor angela merkel. her reaction she has dispatched her top spy chiefs to washington. this comes as an european delegation visits the u.s. >> reporter: the white house said it was unwilling to talk abou--to--contra-ducts reports n german newspapers that not only did president obama know about the surveillance, he fast tracked any information gleaned from angela merkel's surveillance to the white house. >> the president, i think in all he has said about this issue, not just sense the disclosures, but even before them reflects his commitment to insuring that we do everything we have to do within the law to keep america safe, to keep americans safe, and keep our allies safe, and that we do so in a way that reflects the need to find a balance, and to recognize the sincere security--rather privacy concerns that americans have and others have around the world. >> reporter: for the european delegation that has just
. >>>. >>> our special series surviving sandy one year later. loopholes and flood insurance making it tough for families to rebuild. that's tomorrow morning at 7am on al jazeera america. >> hello, welcome back. tonight it's going to be a very dangerous night for some people. we are looking at freezing rain that is falling in some parts of the northern plains. i'm going go up a little closer and you can see how the storm is evolving. the storm came out of the pacific. you can see the circulation here across nevada. it's more than nevada and california, it's to the northern plains. where you see the blue is snow. where you see the pipping is -- pink is freezing rain. it's the dangerous precipitation that can fall, because it comes as rain and freezes on contact to the roads. if it is cold enough. actually, we do now have freezing rain advisories in parts of south dakota - sorry, wyoming as well as into nebraska. dangerous if you are driving. hopefully by tomorrow morning when the sun comes up it will not be a problem, but you can see it - that the rest of the western states are dealing with w
for the affordable care act online debacle. >> oh my gosh, that's beautiful. >> and helping survivors of sandy reclaim some of their most precious belongings. >> some of america's top intelligence leaders were in the hot seat on capitol hill today. they were there to answer difficult questions about recent revelations about u.s. surveillance programs, the hearing took place as lawmakers considered new legislation that would limit the nsa's ability to gather information. randall pinkston joins us at capitol hill. what happened in those nsa hearings today? >> well, tony, the hearing ended an hour ago after an unusual three and a half hours technique. the members of the house select committee on intelligence complimented the work of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and
, but it has been a year since super storm sandy devastated the east coast. 181 people from the caribbean to long island, were killed. and tens of billions of dollars in property were damaged. including many homes on maryland's eastern shore. wjz is live with complete coverage. meteorologist chelsea ingram takes a look back at the storm's impat. but we begin with alex demetrick, who spent the day on chrisfield. the maryland town hit hardest by sandy. >> reporter: recovery is ongoing at chrisfield and will be for sometime. >> reporter: when sandy hit chrisfield, the bay worked its way into ruth fountain's bedroom. >> oh. it was water into the bedroom, into the dresser drawer. just couldn't imagine what it was like. >> reporter: the storm surge turned the town's dock into kindling. and ruined foundations, heating and electrical systems. >> they have been through a lot. because there were people who lost everything. there are people who have damage to their homes. that it's going to take a long time to repair. >> reporter: a nail at a time, one job after the next. from infrastructure like a
hurricane sandy. miles o'brien reports on how new york city is preparing for the next superstorm. test one year later the people who keep this city running are scrambling to figure out how to keep dry as the storms and the sea level rises. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's pbs newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> united healthcare-- online at uhc.com. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: european governments lodged new complaints on both sides of the atlantic today over u.s. surveillance. they followed more disclosures linked to the national security agency. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> in madrid the u.s. ambassador to
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